How Advancements in Healthcare are Influencing the Future of Office Design

ID Collaborative blog post

The healthcare industry is expected to make a big shift by 2040 by placing a larger emphasis on prevention and detection of health issues rather than treatment. As far as the impact this will have on the corporate world goes, it will demand for an increase in health and wellness options in the workplace. Future workplaces will require more than biophilic design and fitness centers in order to foster employee well-being and keep up with rising healthcare costs.
1. Wearable Medical Sensor Technology Wearable sensors like the FitBit and other smart watches are able to measure the user’s heart rate and can tell users when it’s time to take a break, which will also increase a worker’s efficiency and productivity while working. It is anticipated that similar sensors will also become prevalent in future office designs.
2. Physically Supportive Spaces Creating an active workplace environment and an office layout that supports movement is a crucial aspect of the future of office design. A layout that supports movement should incorporate well-defined walkways and paths that encourage “walk and talk” meetings as well as areas that encourage workers to take their conversations outside their usual work station. Evidence has shown that walking increases creative thinking and cognitive engagement among workers.
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3. Mentally Supportive Spaces While coworking spaces and open office environments are very popular in the office design world currently, evidence suggests that on average, 86 minutes a day are lost to distraction in coworking spaces. In order to get the most productivity out of a coworking space, employers will have to create designated spaces in the office that will decrease distraction but also increase invigoration. Having areas where employees can recover and benefit from restorative experiences will help them recover from low-grade stressors common in a work day and ease the employee in order to promote optimal productivity.
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